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The Intent Clause

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The general consensus is that laws are for lawyers, and rules are for bureaucrats; neither of these are in the best interests of the organization. When you look at a rule, you should stop and consider what was intended by such a rule. Most rules can be "bent" a little to accommodate as many as possible, but if you start to view a rule, law, guideline, etc. as in your way (to your goal) or start to calculate how different rules (etc.) could be manipulated or imaginatively re-interpreted (in your favor-of course), then you are in danger of running afoul of this organization. While the American Medievalist's Association is a little lax in its interpretations, it is not forced to keep you and your machinations within its ranks. It is our (AMA) intention to create a diverse (yet time-specific), authentic, medieval, re-enactment-type society that is interesting,  and fun for, it's members. If you do not share in all of these goals, then please join up with another organization! We have no intention of allowing the American Medievalist's Association to become moribund with pettifoggery or be unpleasantly political in nature. To be absolutely clear on this topic: by political, we mean that who you know and who you make deals with should not become more important than what you do and what you really are. This is the whole intent of the reality clause; to devalue B.S.! All of our rules are intended to de-value, de-emphasize, or (if possible) to neutralize those factors that the we perceive as leading us in the wrong direction, while at the same time, favoring those factors that were perceived as beneficial to our goals.                                            

Thus, it is not the exact, precise, legalistic wording of a law, rules, or guideline that is important. What is important is what was obviously intended to be important. If members are unsure of something, then they should ask someone (preferably more experienced) for clarification.


 

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Last modified: April 01, 2002